A resume-driven developer can’t seem to use the same technology, in the same way all over again. When assigned an easy task, he will find ways to over-engineering a solution that will make it less boring. He loves injecting new technology into the current project, often without any upfront with other developers (well, this could be very bad since it may introduces competing UI framework, multiples data access methods, repeated functionalities, etc..). And when asked about it, he wil talk for hours about how horrible the current code/framework in the existing project is.

Does all of that sound familiar to you? If yes, you’re definitely a resume-driven developer.

I have to confess I’m that guy. I’m easy attracted to shiny new, cool technology but I found it hard to find motivation to learn it properly. Working in an actual project helps me learn better with all the challenges and deadline.

Decide what’s the next bullet you want to put on your resume at the end of the project, be it new language, new framework or some responsibilities, request to take that part of the project and make them true.

Resume-driven in itself isn’t bad. It’s actually a sign of a passionate developer. As long as it makes sense to introduce it to the current project without adding too much complexity, it will work. Remember, your code is not for you to read alone. It’s your job to manage the complexity, not to create it.